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Violent Offences

Assault Causing Bodily Harm (s. 267(b)) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishments

What is assault causing bodily harm? Assault causing bodily harm is covered under s. 267(b) of the Criminal Code. Assault causing bodily harm is a mid-range assault offence. This means that assault causing bodily harm is more serious than common assault, however, it is not as serious an aggravated assault offence. What constitutes “bodily harm” is considered to be an injury that is ...

Common Assault (s. 266) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishments

What is common assault? Common assault is covered under s.266 of the Criminal Code.  Assault is an umbrella term that covers a wide variety of situations. Generally, a person is said to have committed an assault when they have directly or indirectly, intentionally or recklessly, applied for to another person or threatened to apply to another person, without that person’s consent. Assault is ...

Aggravated Assault (s. 268) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishments

What is aggravated assault? Aggravated assault is covered under s. 268 of the Criminal Code. Aggravated assault is considered the most serious of all assault charges. Aggravated assault occurs when you wound, maim, disfigure or endanger the life of another. In other words, this would be an assault in which the injuries are more than just minor or serious bodily harm; rather, they ...

Robbery (s. 322 (1)) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishments

What is Robbery? Robbery is a violent property offence that is considered one of the most serious under Canadian criminal law. Individuals charged with robbery are often subsequently charged with other violent offences including assault and theft. The offence is covered under s. 343 of the Criminal Code of Canada (the “Code”) and is a straight indictable offence, meaning the expected punishment is ...

Break and Enter (s. 348 (1)) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishment

What is “breaking and entering” in Canada? Breaking and entering or as commonly referred to as a “B&E” offence, is criminalized under sections 348(1)-(3) of the Criminal Code. In Canada, breaking and entering involves either: entry into a “place” with the intent to commit an indictable offence; entry into a “place” where one commits an indictable offence; or breaking out of a “place” ...

Uttering Threats (s. 264.1 (1)) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishments

What is uttering threats? Uttering threats is covered under s.264.1 of the Criminal Code. A charge of uttering threats can result from a wide variety of acts; however, generally, uttering threats refers to making statements expressing an intention to cause physical harm or death to someone, damaging their property, or injuring an individual’s animal or bird. Prosecuting an individual for an uttering threat ...

Animal Cruelty (s. 445 – 447) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishments

What is animal cruelty? Animal cruelty laws are covered under s.445 to s.447 of the Criminal Code. Under these sections of the Criminal Code it is an offence to willfully cause animals to suffer from neglect, pain or injury. There has been much criticism directed towards animal cruelty laws in Canada by academics and legal scholars alike. This is due to the wording ...

Arson (s. 433 – 436) Charges in Canada: Offences, Defences, Punishments

What is Arson? Arson involves causing damage to property by intentionally or recklessly causing a fire or an explosion. It is relatively rare in comparison to other criminal offences but is still considered a serious crime in Canada. The Criminal Code of Canada  (the “Code”) identifies five separate offences for arson, in sections 433 through 436. Examples Examples of arson include: Setting fire to your ...

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